Thursday, February 2, 2012

Injury vs. illness

Injury sucks because one can't do what one wants to do usually because one injured one's self doing what one wanted to do and therefore the injury prevents one from doing said wanted thing. Injury tends to last a long time, but utter misery can be avoided by avoiding use of the injured part.

Illness sucks because one can't do what one wants to do because one's whole body feels like it was taped to the inside of one of those gigantic industrial rolling doors and then the door was opened. Turns out, such general malaise not only affects one's physical ability to engage in an otherwise enjoyable activity, but the will to actually raise one's self from whatever horizontal surface one finds one's self on is also crushed like the figurative body in the industrial door analogy.

The title of this blog contains "junkie," because I and my cohorts are addicts. On Friday the question is never "are you going to do something this weekend," but rather "what are your plans this weekend?" Putting a planned outing on the shelf due to injury or illness is like taking the cigarettes from a smoker who has no interest in quitting.

The demands of my profession have lately become such that I plan everything I do a year in advance. Professionally, my product plans always include some management reserve to account for time consumed by unanticipated demands. Similarly, my training plan for this season also included a week of reserve for injury or illness. My training plan* began this week. My reserve is already nearly exhausted.

*For the upcoming cycling season. Skiing has officially been written off.

7 comments:

  1. Just yesterday it occurred to me I hadn't heard from you in a while. So you've been injured and ill? Bummer.

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  2. I am so so so close to buying a pair of skinny carving skis to deal with our seemingly constant firm conditions. However, living in Utah it just seems wrong to even consider a ski with a 67-78mm waist!

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  4. And, all things considered - not that there's ever a good time for injury or illness - at least you're not missing out on any epic backcountry tours in feet of newly fallen blower powder.

    Hope you feel better soon.

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  5. Kris: Injuries have been minor and not enough to keep me down. Illness has only been this week, and nothing like what Ricky is going through. So don't shed too many tears.

    UTRider: Just ski faster on your big skis.

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  6. On the upside, an injury and/or illness might free one's time so as to fabricate a blog entry (or eight) that might educate and/or entertain the masses, who may or may not need a break between the figuring of a Kansas Property Tax credit for seniors, and instructing said senior on the proper way to depreciate a vehicle.

    So, thanks for that.

    As an aside, I'm so not happy with your employer right now. So not happy! Or more so, I'm so not happy with a certain criminal or criminals who is/are six years older now than at the time of the crime, and the subsequent actions by employer to punish wife of employee with employee's absence from home instead of said six-years-older criminal or criminals.

    (Was that vague enough?)

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  7. Rabid: vague as you were, I know exactly what you are talking about. Said employer, some six months ago, decided to split my product from the group to which spouse's product belongs. So I have, for the most part, been spared. On the downside, my new group is understaffed, so we are more or less in the same boat in terms of time spent at work.

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